Kasauli

Solan, Himachal Pradesh

#Adventure/Trekking #City #Nature and Scenic


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Kasauli is a small hill town in the north Indian state of Himachal Pradesh. It’s home to gabled colonial-era houses, orchards and green-roofed Christ Church, dating from the mid-19th century. At the southern edge of town, Monkey Point overlooks forests of horse chestnut and Himalayan oak. A small temple also sits atop the hill. Nearby, the Gilbert Nature Trail winds through lush green countryside rich in birdlife.

Kasauli is a small town in the south-west part of Himachal and is on the relatively lower edges of Himalayas. Nestled amidst beautiful woody forests of pine and cedar trees, Kasauli owes its mystical and serene ambience to the lavish Victorian buildings built by the Britishers who resided here years back. These structures speak volumes of the glorious past of this hill station. A lot of endangered species of fauna are also found in the dense forests in this region. Kasauli is not about particular attractions or activities, but about the serene environment and enchanting calmness that it provides. If you want to just find a good getaway from the hectic life of your city, Kasauli provides the ideal environment to soothe your nerves.

Landmarks of Kasauli

  1. The Central Research Institute (CRI), originally the Pasteur Institute of India, was established at Kasauli in 1904 under its first director Sir David Semple, as an institute working in the fields of immunology and virological research. The CRI works as a World Health Organization ‘Collaborating Centre’, and as an immuno-biological laboratory producing vaccines for measles and polio, and the DTP group of vaccines. It also provides a Master of Science programme in Microbiology.
  2. Kasauli Baptist Church is a 1923 brick and wood building situated close to the Sadar Bazzar. According to The Indian Express it is "considered a unique example of colonial architecture of the British era". In 2008 the church was damaged by a fire which destroyed all internal furnishings.

  3. Christ Church was previously an Anglican church, inaugurated on 24 July 1853. Since 1970 it has been under the auspices of the Church of North India (CNI) in the diocese of Amritsar. The church contains Spanish and Italian imported stained glass windows depicting Christ, Mary, Saint Barnabas and Saint Francis. The Parsonage was built in 1850 for priests of the Anglican church.

  4. Krishna Bhawan Mandir, a Hindu shrine, was located in the middle of the town. Dedicated to Lord Krishna, the temple exhibits blend of European and Indian architecture. The mandir is situated in the town and attracts tourists throughout the year. Krishna Bhawan Mandir was built in the year 1926 during the British regime. Imperial rulers, specialists of grand buildings came together with local craftsmen to construct this beautiful shrine. Keeping in mind the principles of Vastu Shastra, the designers and craftsmen built this religious monument.

  5. Mahlog State The state of Mahlog was founded in 1183.Its original rulers were ruling earlier near Kalka when Mohamad Gauri attacked that area then they shifted to Mahlog area.Initially 193 villages were in its jurisdiction but later over 300 villages were included in it.It was the one of the biggest Princely State of Simla Hill States under British Raj.

  6. Monkey Point This is the highest point in Kasauli, the place where Lord Hanuman is believed to have set his feet while on his way to look for the Sanjeevani buti (herb). Around 4 km from the Kasauli bus stand, at its top, is a temple dedicated to Lord Hanuman that lies within the premises of the Air Force base. As such, there are a few restrictions: one is not allowed to carry bags or cameras inside. The hike up to the temple can be a bit difficly for those who are not used to climbing, but it is worth the effort. The views from atop the hill are simply magnificent if the day is clear. You can watch the brilliant sparkle of the Sutlej river as it makes its way through the plains, and the pure beauty of the snow-capped peaks of the Dhauladhar Range.

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30.90129, 76.9648753
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